theorthodoxbritreturns:

Today is the name day of HAH Oecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople.  

May the Lord grant him many years and Peaceful times.

theorthodoxbritreturns:

Today is the name day of HAH Oecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople.

May the Lord grant him many years and Peaceful times.

How Transit, Walkability Help Make Cities More Affordable
F. Kaid Benfield, huffingtonpost.com
Highly enlightening new data from the New York City-based Citizens Budget Commission demonstrate the immense importance of walkability and transit in shaping how affordable large US cities are for a range of household types. When typical housing a…

How Transit, Walkability Help Make Cities More Affordable
F. Kaid Benfield, huffingtonpost.com

Highly enlightening new data from the New York City-based Citizens Budget Commission demonstrate the immense importance of walkability and transit in shaping how affordable large US cities are for a range of household types. When typical housing a…

Reblogged from Smarter Cities
Try and stay fresh and engaged and have something in your heart that you want to say feels important to you.
— Reflecting on the secret of his creative longevity in a recent interview, Stephen King echoes Henry Miller on the secret of remaining young at heart. (via explore-blog)
Reblogged from Explore
As I look back on my life, I realize that every time I thought I was being rejected from something good, I was actually being re-directed to something better.
— Steve Maraboli (via onlinecounsellingcollege)
Reblogged from COUNSELLING BLOG
It is impossible to live without failing at something – unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all – in which case you die by default.
— J.K. Rowling (via onlinecounsellingcollege)
Reblogged from COUNSELLING BLOG

Summer dance: a hiatus, and a return to adult ballet

Since I last posted about my dance experience, I ended up moving to another city, where I got a new job and have since moved to a new studio in the process. This one is very different from the last, because it has classes specifically for adults who want to do ballet; I have not been in such a class since 2012. 

I was on a hiatus from dance because my wife and I welcomed a new baby into our household, and going to dance class was not a priority in comparison to helping a spouse recover from an unexpected C-section. But in those 4 months, I have received a lot of amazing feedback about my dancing, and found the encouragement to keep going. My fellow adults kept me thinking about how much dance means to me.

Now, my teacher’s name is Miss Celia- yes, the Miss is part of it- and I went to my first class last week, which had a total of 18 students, ranging from 20 to around 70 in age. It was tougher than any class I’d ever taken- even the first pre-pro class I had- and I struggled a lot, but I was told, by Miss Celia, that I did an alright job for my first time. People are a lot more friendly, and the lack of competitive nature makes me feel as if this will be a far better setting for me. I didn’t mind mentoring kids here and there, but I really missed dancing with adults, and building the company that comes with it. Now, I get to dance 2-3 times a week, 90 minutes a time, for $10 a class.

I also have a good opportunity to recover from the last few months, as I gained a few pounds from not dancing; I now ride a bicycle for part of my trip to the ballet studio, which helps me warm up somewhat. I am working to build my strength up, drop weight, and get healthier again, and I have amazing support for doing so from my wife, colleagues, and now fellow adult dancers. 

I’m looking forward to seeing what happens in this studio.

In due time,” said the third, “we shall be home-sick once more for quiet water-lilies swaying on the surface of an English stream. But to-day all that seems pale and thin and very far away. Just now our blood dances to other music.
— Kenneth Grahame, “The Wind in the Willows.”
The years between eighteen and twenty-eight are the hardest, psychologically. It’s then you realize this is make or break, you no longer have the excuse of youth, and it is time to become an adult.
— Helen Mirren (via onlinecounsellingcollege)
Reblogged from COUNSELLING BLOG

A New Orleans-based librarian known as “the book lady” for her dedication to her community has won the inaugural Lemony Snicket Prize for Noble Librarians Faced With Adversity.

Laurence Copel will receive $3,000 in prize money for her efforts, which include setting up a library in her own home and riding her bicycle to reach families in need of books. The award, announced Monday, is co-sponsored by the American Library Association and Lemony Snicket author Daniel Handler. The ALA and Handler cited Copel as a librarian who managed difficult times with “integrity and dignity intact.”

First of all, how awesome of Daniel Handler is it to offer this prize? Congratulations to Ms. Copel!

Pair with the latest Lemony Snicket gem, illustrated by Handler’s wife, Lisa Brown, then complement with this photographic love letter to public libraries and librarians.

(via explore-blog)
Reblogged from Explore